*Generation Clash*

New Releases: 9/12/2021-9/18/2021

This week's new releases include: Aberdeen, BLOODCAT + Neemy, The Criticals, Florence Black, Liberty Deep Down, material pleasures, The Pretty Reckless, tiLLie, Tony & The Kiki, and ZIG MENTALITY!

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Premiere: Liberty Deep Down

Liberty Deep Down, or LDD for short, are an energetic rock band from Columbus, Ohio. Combining soaring melodies with catchy synth, huge riffs, and strong beats, they deliver their take on pop-rock with a unique edge and passionate sense of dynamic. Having played shows big and small with artists of various genres, LDD always stand their ground and make their mark on stage to leave fans wanting more.

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Premiere: Aberdeen

A modern grunge/alt-rock band, comprised of Jake Linder and Matt Bolling, based out of Dallas, Texas. Fusing the heaviness of the '90s with the polished kick of modern rock.

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Retronaut Favorites: Billy Squier

My earliest memories of hearing Billy Squier is from when I was a kid. My brother and I got into “Lonely Is The Night” from Guitar Hero: Rocks The ‘80s" when we were growing up. I also recall seeing copies of “Emotions In Motion” and “Don’t Say No” at the 24 South Main location of Gallery Of Sound before it closed. When I first got into my dad’s band, “L.A. Trash”, he mentioned that his singer, Alan, used to break out into certain songs during rehearsals, and “The Big Beat” was one of them. I featured "The Big Beat" on the first mixtape I ever made in 2013. I eventually checked out “The Tale Of The Tape” and it became one of my favorite albums. Songs like "Rich Kid", "Who Knows What A Love Can Do", and "Young Girls" are songs that made his debut a classic. Most people know him for "The Stroke", but he is one of many artists that have so many incredible songs in their catalog besides their hits. He is also a rare example of someone who has hit songs that are really good as well as fantastic deep cuts. Every album of his is great because it's unique. He's not trying to imitate anyone. Billy Squier is creating his own kind of music and that's why he's great. He's not afraid to be original.

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Premiere: Nory-J

We have something wonderful to share. Today is the release date of the very first single by Nory-J, who is the indie pop pseudonym of former Bath phenomenon Jack Spooner. Band turned solo croc pot, the name has found itself with BBC Radio Bristol, international reviewers and throughout NEXT and Marks and Spencer stores across the UK.

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Modern Day Rock

At GenClash, we love to share playlists that are diverse in order to promote many genres instead of just one, but we've made an exception because there are so many great rock artists, new and old, making music that deserves to be heard.

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Interviewed On Generation Clash

On Generation Clash, we have interviewed many artists including: Scarlet Magnum, Riot Course, The Great Leslie, Cold Shoulder, Liberty Deep Down, Terreyl Fields, Profit Drama, Lost Arts, Va Va Voom, and many more!

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Under The Radar: White Hot Odyssey

White Hot Odyssey is an American hard rock band formed in Eugene, Oregon in 2002. They were formed by Steve Perry and Jason Moss of Cherry Poppin’ Daddies, and Mark Rogers, Ed Cole, and Jivan Valpey. In Steve’s words, White Hot Odyssey was an attempt bring back the idea of “roll” in rock and roll. It was reminsciencet f the glam, hard rock and protopunk that was around in the 1970s. He wanted to do this project because he always had the dream to front a band of this style from when he was really young, and because he listened to New York Dolls, The Stooges, Sweet, and T.Rex. They were known to open up for the Cherry Poppin’ Daddies, and no one had any clue that Perry was in the opening and the main act! In 2004, White Hot Odyssey was signed to Jive Records, a decision influenced by the popularity of The Darkness. White Hot Odyssey is absolutely incredible. It’s a complete breakaway from the style of Cherry Poppin’ Daddies. It’s so cool sounding, and the lyrics are amazing because it references everything that those rock songs talk about, but in a truer way. In most of those 70s songs, they used double entendres, but White Hot Odyssey talks about those same topics and doesn't use double entendres and it shows how most of those songs were about that, it just wasn't directly stated by those bands. In most songs of this style, you hear about fame and fortune, but in these songs, they talk about what really happens. This includes the things that seem like a big deal because of fame, but is actually just the crazy stuff you wind up in because of how you can be influenced when everything is a little too lavish. The style is amazing because it has pays homage to all the great rock bands, and it’s still original. It’s not nearly as talked about as it should be, because it's truly original. This is another album that falls into the category of albums that are widely overlooked, but are great nonetheless. This album exists and it can be found and the existence is what matters. If it exists, it can be heard. If it can heard, it can be shared. Society can call it a hidden gem, but for those who dig deep, this is an instant classic.

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Premiere: Kyle Duke & The Brown Bag Boys

On Friday September 3, Brooklyn DIY rock outfit Kyle Duke and the Brown Bag Boys make their return to the local stage at Lower East Side's Arlene’s Grocery, coinciding with the release of their latest single “Inbred” that same day.

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Interview: Broken Baby

1: How did you decide on the name, “Broken Baby"?I wish it had some real meaning, but it just kind of popped in one of our heads while we were walking home from a record shop. Not even sure what inspired it... but once Broken Baby came out we were like, "yeah, ok. That seems cool."2: What inspires you to create?Our impending death.3: What advice would you give to someone who wants to be in a creative profession?Have a backup plan. And stop caring what anyone has to say about what you create. Don't worry if it sucks. Just keep doing it.4: Do you feel open minded about what you listen to? Do you like going out of your comfort zone?Yeah! We both love listening to all kinds of new music. If it's good, it's undeniable no matter the genre.5: What outlets do you find out about music from? (Record stores, magazines, samplers, etc.)Friends. But also word of mouth by those who carefully curate their playlists and genuinely love finding new music. I find a lot of new music from certain people I follow on Twitter.6: What is your favorite format to listen to music on? (CD, Vinyl, etc.)Nothing beats the sound of your favorite album on a record player.7: What band/artist do you think everyone should listen to?Pleasure Venom, Young Winona, Human Barbie, Tummyache, Pure Adult, Reckling...there are so many new bands to fall in love with these days!8: What motivates you to check out a new artist?We want to be fans of new bands. And we want to see it live - and if the live show blows our face off we're fans for life.9: Who was the first band/artist that became your favorite band?I don't know if I can remember a first favorite, but I do remember being quite obsessed with Madonna for about a decade.Living Colour was Alex's first real all-time favorite band.10: What was the inspiration for your song “Madonna's A Dick”?It was inspired by the 80s documentary “Heavy Metal Parking Lot,” where the the zebra-print jumpsuit guy gives his opinion on Madonna. “She’s a dick,” he says. Women are constantly met with systemic sexism and oftentimes dismissed. Even with all our progress, the double standard is still alive and well today.

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Retronaut Selects: Max Demian - The Call Of The Wild (1980)

This is the second of only two albums released by The Max Demian Band. I remember ordering a promo copy of it on eBay along with a "A Perfect Fit" by Frankie Miller. When I listened to it the first time, I was amazed to hear another Max Demian album and I didn't really have any thoughts about the album. I was processing that there was another Max Demian album.

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Retronaut Favorites: Maroon 5

I first found out about Maroon 5 when I was little. The earliest memory I have of them is seeing the music video for “This Love” countless times during my childhood. I always remembered hearing that song growing up, but I realized how much I loved their music when their album, "Hands All Over" came out and it was all I listened to at that time. That album came out when I was in 6th grade, and I remember listening to it when I was working on my schoolwork for online school. This was during the time in my life when I left public school to start online school. It allowed me to have the time to really find the music I connected to. Since I had the time to explore, I started to discover all the bands I truly loved. This ranged from Maroon 5 to Red Hot Chili Peppers to Queen to Foo Fighters to Neon Trees to The Hives and many more. I’m not insanely into the genre of pop rock, but I’ve always loved Maroon 5 because of seeing them at such an early age. They're an artist I associate to my childhood, so they'll always be an artist that's special to me because they were one of the first bands that made me realize that I love music. They've made albums in different styles, but I listen to the earlier catalog. Specifically, Hands All Over and It Won't Be Soon Before Long. I remember having a love/hate relationship with V, but when I rediscovered that album, I felt differently about it. As many people know, I listen to music in a lot of ways, so I feel differently about what I listen to, depending on my mood. Some albums I listen to and I like it, but I don't love it. Then, I'll relisten to it on another day and love it. Relistening is very important because sometimes the only thing preventing you from enjoying an album is your mood.

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New Releases: 8/20/2021-8/27/2021

This week's new releases include: Beauty School Dropout, Cold Shoulder, Egg Drop Soup, Jaws The Shark, Leprous, Jizzy Pearl's Love/Hate, Cat Marina, Poppy, Roxx Revolt & The Velvets, Single By Sunday and Victory!

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The New Music

One of my favorite books about music is "The New Music" by Glenn A. Baker & Stuart Coupe. It was given to me by my dad in 2013, and I discovered artists like The Bottles, Angelic Upstarts, Flash & The Pan, Soo Catwoman, New Adventures, The Angels, DMZ, Cherry Vanilla, Chelsea, The Cortinas, Sector 27, The Motels, Sue Saad, Dyan Diamond, Kirsty MacColl, Cold Chisel, Bette Bright, John Foxx, Snakefinger, Madness, The Bodysnatchers, and The Breakers! 

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Under The Radar: Love/Hate

Love/Hate was formed in 1985, after Jizzy Pearl joined Jon E. Love, Skid Rose, and Joey Gold, in a 1980s electronica influenced band called Data Clan. They all lived together in a L.A. warehouse called SoulHouse, and they released a 4 song EP, and they did a small tour of Mexico, but it wasn’t well received. By 1986, they decided to change their name to Love/Hate, after a song they played called Love and Hate. They transitioned out of the glam look into a gothic rock style. They tried all different styles of music and they pitched to numerous record companies, in an attempt to get signed. By 1987, they settled on rock as their genre. An early version of of their song, “She’s An Angel”, was featured in “A Nightmare On Elm Street: The Dream Master”. They began performing regularly at the “No Bozo Jam” at the Whisky, and they improved their repertoire. They were still conflicted, because at that time, a lot of bands who were performing at the Whisky were getting signed, and Love/Hate was being overlooked. They eventually put together a 4 track demo in December 1988 and they finally got a record deal with Columbia. On February 22, 1990, their debut album “Blackout In The Red Room” was released and it reached No. 154 on the Billboard 200. They did a small club tour, and they opened for Dio on an arena tour. There was a music video for “Why Do You Think They Call It Dope?” and it was played often, specifically on Headbanger’s Ball, and they were able to go on tour with AC/DC, which became the first tour they would do in the UK. In 1991, they wrapped up their tour, and they started to write material for their second album. The initial songs they submitted were all rejected, and they chose to relocate to New York City, where they lived together as they did in their formative years. At this point, they started having creative differences with the label. They were progressing towards a crossover sound, which had more radio appeal, but the label thought that they were losing their edge. The band wanted to release “Miss America” as a single, but the label vetoed this, and decided to put out “Happy Hour”. Despite all this tension, Love/Hate scored a slot opening for Skid Row, 6 months before the album was released. The label made a decision to release an EP to support the upcoming tour and went against the band’s wishes to release “Evil Twin”, which was a song that was rejected for the second album. While they were touring, Skid made numerous comments against the label, while the rest of the band attempted to divert attention those comments from being published. There was an incident where Jizzy got into a drunken fight with Sebastian Bach, and this led to the band briefly being thrown off the tour. They settled their differences before the next show. In 1992, Wasted In America was released, and they embarked on another European tour, where they opened for Ozzy Osbourne. Upon returning to America, they were told that Columbia was going to drop them from the label, due to “Happy Hour” not selling well, and the follow-up single, “Wasted In America” wasn’t getting much airplay on the radio. After Columbia dropped them, Skid sold his car to finance their third album. “Let’s Rumble” was released in 1993, and the band went embarked on a 9-week US club tour. BMG ended up picking up the album and they released it in the UK, and it was followed by a 3-week UK tour. However, the label didn’t want to release the album in the US. The band sent the album to a number of labels, but with the rise of grunge, their style of rock was considered to be out of fashion and there was no interest. Eventually, they signed with a minor label to release “Let’s Rumble”, but it the release was delayed to January 1994. Their manager gave a copy to the album to the KNAC radio station, where the lead single, “Spinning Wheel” started to get heavy airplay. Sadly, the band was unable to release it either as a single or an album, and despite playing to packed audiences, they were unable to capitalize on this popularity. Since the album was delayed, this derailed any chance of having the chance to take advantage of the airplay, and by the time the album was released, it was too late. In 1995, the band started writing and recording their fourth album, “I’m Not Happy”. It was released on Mayhem Records. In December 1995, they played a two-week tour in Germany. During this time, the members of Love/Hate had side projects, but they collapsed, and they took excerpts of old b-sides and other unreleased songs to put out another Love/Hate album. Eventually, since they were upset and frustrated, they decided to sell all their equipment and Love/Hate split up. In 1999, Jizzy put together an album of old Sineaters tracks that he had written, and it was released on the Perris label under Love/Hate. To me, Love/Hate is one of the greatest bands ever and the best bands seem to have one thing in common. They persevere. It's very easy to quit, but the best bands don't because they have something to say. For some reason record labels make artists feel like being different is a bad thing...and this is only because if it's too different, it can't be capitalized. Making money is prioritized in the music industry instead of putting money into helping artists, or even taking the time to talk about artists. What I do here on Generation Clash is share information about artists, because I love these artists and I want others to check them out. This doesn't mean you have to love every artist I love, but at least listen to it instead of overlooking it.

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Retronaut Favorites: Faster Pussycat

My earliest memory of Faster Pussycat is playing “Bathroom Wall” on Guitar Hero Encore: Rocks The ‘80s. As I got older, I remember talking about them with my dad, and he would always mention how he really liked their second album, “Wake Me When It’s Over”. I finally gave “Wake Me When It’s Over” a listen during my first year of college, and I remembered loving it, and I was astounded at how great it was. I also recall hearing “Nonstop To Nowhere” on a Concrete Corner tape. It was during a night when I was going through cassettes, and I remember really enjoying that song, eve though it’s a little different than their earlier catalog. I love Faster Pussycat and I always feel like they’re really misread. I say this because everyone knows them for “Bathroom Wall”, which is a great tune, but there’s so much more to them than that song and “Wake Me When It’s Over” proves that. It has so many great songs and it’s so underrated. There’s always more to a band than a hit song. It doesn’t mean you have to hate the hit, but be open minded to hearing a band’s catalog because it’s worth it to give stuff a listen. You’re never obligated to love everything, but learn to give things a chance, and then form an opinion.

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Back To School

The new school year has begun! Here are some tunes to study to! Take notes because these are the artists you need to know.

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Retronaut Selects: Skulls - Blacklight 13 (1987)

I first found out about Skulls from going to Double Decker Records! It was an album that I found when I was flipping through the 50% off section, and it seemed odd that it was in that section because most of what I saw in that section was newer releases that were discounted. Since it was the only older release I saw there, I decided to ask the clerk if it was 50% off. He said that it was. That clerk ended up becoming one of my close friends, Chris, who works at Double Decker and is the DJ for the radio shows, A.M. Transistor, and now Midday Melodies!

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Under The Radar: Walter Egan

My earliest memories of Walter Egan are from the Gallery Of Sound 24 South Main location. Before I became a serious record collector, I used to go through the used vinyl section at 24 South Main. While I was there, I would take pictures of the albums that caught my eye and I would take portraits of myself in the record store too.

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Retronaut Selects: Strapps - Strapps (1976)

I first found out about Strapps from a Japanese music magazine called Ongaku Senka! I remember seeing photos of them and finding it interesting that they were a lesser known act that Japan was always talking about. Most magazines talk about popular acts often, but I thought it was cool that they were talking about this newer, lesser known act in the same way.

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